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cable bicep curl

Cable Bicep Curl: Videos & Variations

Looking for an in-depth guide on how to do a cable bicep curl? If so, you’ll be glad that you landed here, as OriGym has gathered everything that you need to know about this exercise in one place. 

Complete with clear demonstration images and videos, our article will be the perfect companion for when you next want to complete this exercise in the gym, especially since you no longer have to worry about proper cable bicep curl form. 

Before we jump right in, have you ever thought about turning your passion for fitness into a career? Check out our large range of PT qualifications here, or download OriGym’s course prospectus for more information. 

What is a Cable Bicep Curl? 

The standing bicep cable curl is an exercise that trains the biceps in isolation, and places the muscles under constant tension throughout both the concentric and eccentric phases. This is one of the biggest cable bicep curl benefits over other methods of curling. 

It is popular with strength training beginners thanks to the simplicity of the exercise, and the fact that the cable itself assists the user in lifting the weight. 

We go through exactly how to do a cable bicep curl below, but it essentially involves standing in front of the cable machine and pulling the attached bar or handles upwards in a curling motion, as you would during a regular free weight bicep curl. 

Also, feel free to download our FREE 16 Week Home Strength Training Programme:

Cable Bicep Curls VS Dumbbell Curls: Which is Better?

one arm cable curl

Now, this has been up for debate for as long as anyone in the fitness industry can remember. 

There are pros and cons surrounding both sides of the argument and we could spend hours discussing it to reach a final conclusion, but we will keep our answer short and sweet for your benefit. 

Cable bicep curls provide the user with a constant level of resistance throughout the exercise, which is one of the main benefits of performing them. They are also easy to perform, and great for beginners. 

On the other hand, dumbbell curls alongside curls performed with other types of free weights are better in the long run for developing muscular hypertrophy as they allow the user to train with progressive overload, and are therefore more challenging for the muscles.  

That being said, it all boils down to what your individual fitness goals are as well as what exercise method you prefer. 

As noted by Brad Schoenfeld (MSc, President of Global Fitness Services) in his study, ‘The Mechanisms of Muscle Hypertrophy and Their Application to Resistance Training’: 

It is a well-accepted fitness tenet that varying exercise parameters (i.e., angle of pull, position of extremities, etc.) can cause different activation patterns within muscle compartments, and making synergists more active or less active.

It is important to perform a variety of strength based exercises across different types of exercise equipment to achieve optimum results, so that your muscles are challenged from a range of angles. If you train them in the same way during each session, they will adapt to a limited range of exercises and you will reach a plateau in your training. 

To avoid this, it is a good idea to perform standing cable curls alongside other free weight bicep curls, such as those using a dumbbell or a barbell if you are looking to develop your strength and muscular hypertrophy as rapidly as possible. 

How to do a Cable Bicep Curl 

Set Up: For the standing cable curl, you will need a cable machine set to an appropriate weight that you are comfortable working with, as well as a cable bar attachment. 

Starting Position: 

bicep cable curl

  • Face the cable machine with your feet at around hip-width apart on the floor. There should be a slight bend in your knees. 
  • Hold the cable bar attachment in an underhand grip, your hands in a wide grip positioning, and have it suspended in front of your thighs.  
  • In this position, your arms should be extended with a slight bend in your elbows. 
  • Stand tall with your back straight, shoulders back, and your elbows tucked in close to your sides. Your head should also be in line with your spine. 

Execution:

cable bicep curl image

  • Inhale, and ensure that your core is tight before you begin the standing cable curl. Check out this guide on how to engage your core by OriGym if you are unsure about how to do this.
  • Exhale as you curl the attachment upwards, ensuring that your elbows remain in a fixed position throughout the movement. Keep the tempo slow. 
  • Once your elbows reach a 90-degree angle, hold your position for at least two seconds. Inhale. 
  • Bring the attachment back down into the starting position, exhaling as you do so and keeping a slight bend in your elbows at the bottom of the movement ready for your next repetition. Make sure that you do not drop the weight into the stack, and that you keep it suspended. 
  • Repeat the standing bicep cable curl for your desired amount of repetitions!

Cable Bicep Curl Muscles Worked:

Primary Movers: Biceps. 

Secondary Muscles: Anterior deltoid, trapezius, levator scapulae, brachialis, brachioradialis, core.

Cable Bicep Curl Mistakes to Avoid

  • Allowing the weights to drop. This is one of the most common cable bicep curl mistakes, yet the easiest to correct. Instead of allowing the weights to drop into the stack at the end of each repetition, you should ensure that they remain suspended throughout the exercise to keep the biceps under tension. Since this is the straight bar bicep cable curl, this is easier to control. 
  • Locking out the elbows. You should keep a slight bend in your elbows during both the top and the bottom of the standing bicep curl on a cable machine to maintain a good level of resistance. If you do lock out your elbows, you will place pressure on the elbow and shoulder joints and risk injuring yourself. 
  • Rushing through repetitions. When performing the cable bicep curl, you should ensure that you squeeze your biceps at the top of the movement and hold your position for at least two seconds before you move back into the starting position. If you perform the exercise too quickly, you will shift the pressure away from your biceps and place it onto the stabilising muscles instead, therefore eradicating the benefits that you are looking to achieve through completing the exercise. 

Cable Bicep Curl Benefits:

  • The double bicep cable curl primarily targets the biceps brachii during both the concentric and eccentric phases of the exercise, and this makes it an effective cable machine exercise to perform if you are looking to train this muscle in isolation. If you are currently looking to develop the strength and hypertrophy of the biceps, OriGym’s list of the best bicep exercises will allow you to put together a complete training programme that hits both heads of the muscle in numerous ways.
  • Aside from isolating the biceps, another of the main cable bicep curl benefits is that the exercise involves the stabilising muscles within the upper back and shoulders. These include the anterior deltoid, trapezius, and the levator scapulae, and training them will aid you in building strength within your upper body holistically, which In turn means that you will find it easier to progress to compound bicep exercises. Completing compound exercises alongside cable curls will boost your overall progress, and help you to avoid a plateau in your training. 

Cable Bicep Curl Regression & Progression

To make the exercise easier (cable bicep curl regression):

  • Use a lighter weight setting. It may seem obvious, but this is the simplest way of making the exercise easier if you are struggling to complete it. It is much better than trying to perform the exercise with poor form, and using progressive overload is the best way to train your muscles. 
  • Perform the standing one-arm cable curl. If you are attempting the exercise from a seated position, you will actually find that it is less challenging to complete whilst standing. This is because your biceps are working against a decreased level of ground reaction force, and they receive some help from the stabilising muscles in your core and upper body when curling the weight. 

To make the exercise more difficult (cable bicep curl progression):

  • Up the weight setting. The simplest form of cable bicep curl progression is to up the amount of weight that you are lifting. This is called progressive overload, and training this way will ensure that you build on your muscular strength and hypertrophy over time. 
  • Lift one leg. As long as you have good balance and do this with proper form, you can make the exercise more challenging by lifting one leg up. This will recruit more of the stabilising muscles within the biceps, as well as in both the core and the upper body, and make the exercise significantly more challenging without you having to up the weight that you’re curling. 
  • Perform the exercise seated. Not only will this eradicate the ability to rely on momentum when curling the weight and isolate the muscles further, but it will increase the level of ground reaction force that the biceps must work against when curling the weight. This makes the exercise much more challenging, and will give you better results in the long run. 
  • Perform the cable preacher curl. If you’re looking for effective cable machine bicep curl variations that will make the exercise more difficult, the cable preacher curl is ideal. The fact that the back of the upper arm is fixed to the preacher bench means that the bicep must work harder to curl the weight as it cannot rely on momentum. 

Cable Bicep Curl Variations 

#1 - Standing One-Arm Cable Curl 

Set Up: For this exercise, a standing bicep cable curl alternative, you will need the cable pulley machine set to a weight that you are comfortable working with. You will also need a handle attachment, since this is the standing one-arm cable curl. 

Starting Position:

single arm cable bicep curl

  • Face the cable machine, your feet flat on the floor and positioned at around hip-width apart. Ensure that your knees are slightly bent. 
  • Grab the handle attachment with your right arm in an underhand grip; your palm should be facing upwards, and the handle should be suspended in front of your right thigh. You may find it comfortable to rest your left arm behind your back. 
  • Have your elbows tucked in close to your sides, so that they are able to remain in a stable position throughout the exercise. 
  • Ensure that your back is straight, and that your head is in line with your spine. 

Execution:

standing bicep cable curl

  • Inhale, and make sure that your core is fully engaged before starting the exercise. 
  • Carefully curl the handle upwards, exhaling as you do so and ensuring that your elbow remains in a fixed position. Squeeze your right bicep as you near the top of the movement. 
  • Once your elbow reaches a 90-degree angle, pause for at least two seconds. Inhale before you resume the exercise. 
  • Steadily lower the handle back into the starting position, exhaling as you do so. Ensure that there is a slight bend in your elbow at the bottom of the movement, and that you do not drop the weight into the stack. 
  • Repeat this for your desired amount of repetitions! 

Standing One-Arm Cable Curl Muscles Worked:

Primary Movers: Biceps brachii. 

Secondary Muscles: Anterior deltoid, trapezius, levator scapulae, brachialis, brachioradialis, core.

Standing One-Arm Cable Curl Mistakes To Avoid:

  • Rushing through repetitions. You need to ensure that you are holding the top position of this exercise for at least two seconds when completing it, and squeezing your bicep as you do so. It is a common mistake to rush through repetitions when completing the single arm cable curl, as using one arm to stabilise the weight can be difficult for those who haven’t previously been used to doing so. Usually, it is a case of using a weight setting that is too heavy, and is easily rectified by switching to a lighter weight. 
  • Body movement. One of the most common standing one-arm cable curl mistakes to avoid is allowing anything other than your forearm to move. If you are prone to rounding your back midway through the exercise or swaying your body or shoulders, it is likely that you have been working with a weight that is too heavy for you, and you are accidentally performing cheat reps with momentum. This is easily done as it is a single arm bicep curl on a cable machine, as opposed to using a dumbbell - we would recommend observing yourself in the mirror as you complete the exercise to avoid this. 

Standing One-Arm Cable Curl Benefits: 

  • One of the most notable benefits of this exercise is the fact that the biceps are given more rest inbetween sets when compared to working both arms in unison. The user is therefore able to perform reps with optimum form each time rather than straining through them. 
  • Performing the single arm cable curl benefits the user as they are able to take advantage of an increased mind-muscle connection, and therefore completely focus all of their attention on the bicep that they are working. This is arguably better for isolating the muscle, and for working the secondary stabilising muscles under increased intensity. 

#2 - Reverse Grip Cable Curl 

Set Up: You will require a cable machine set to an appropriate weight, alongside a cable bar attachment to complete this exercise. 

Starting Position: 

standing cable curl

  • Stand facing the cable machine with your feet at around hip-width apart. 
  • Grip the cable bar attachment with an overhand grip, and position your hands to hold it with a neutral grip; they should be in line with your shoulders. 
  • Ensure that you are standing tall, your back is straight, and that your head is in line with your spine. 
  • Your arms should be extended with a slight bend in your elbows, and your elbows should be tucked in close to your body. 

Execution:

one arm cable curl image

  • Engage your core and inhale before beginning the exercise. 
  • Bending at the elbows, carefully curl the attachment upwards until your elbows are at a 90-degree angle. Exhale as you complete this phase of the exercise. 
  • Inhale, and remain in this position for at least two seconds. 
  • Exhale as you bring the attachment back down into the starting position. There should be a slight bend in your arms at the bottom of the movement, and the weights should remain suspended rather than dropping into the stack. 
  • Repeat!

Muscles Worked:

Primary Movers: Biceps. 

Secondary Muscles: Anterior deltoid, trapezius, levator scapulae, brachialis, brachioradialis, core. 

Common Mistakes to Avoid:

  • Lifting too heavy. Since this exercise uses the cable machine, it is easy to be deceived by the amount of weight that you are lifting and start off on a setting that is too heavy. You should ensure that you are able to complete the exercise with proper form and tempo throughout, and switch to a lighter weight if you are unable to do so. 
  • Locking out your elbows. Doing so can remove a good portion of the pressure that is placed on the biceps, and shift this elsewhere (usually the elbow and shoulder joints). You should ensure that you keep your arms slightly bent throughout the exercise to avoid this, and to maintain a good level of resistance. 
  • Flaring the elbows. You should ensure that your elbows are tucked in close at your sides throughout this exercise, and avoid allowing them to move from this position at any time. Even if you are aware of this being one of the common cable bicep curl mistakes, it is an easy one to make if you are not used to this grip variation. Performing the exercise in front of a mirror can help you to monitor this mistake and correct it accordingly. 

Benefits of this Exercise:

  • This exercise is one of the best cable bicep curl variations for those who have reached a plateau in their training, and are looking for alternative ways to train their biceps. The reverse grip adds a new element to the cable rope bicep curl as it strengthens the wrist joint, which can actually allow the user to progress to more advanced compound weightlifting exercises, such as the chest press and the back squat. Performing these exercises alongside your usual arm routine can allow you to overhaul your fitness progress. 
  • Another of the reverse cable rope bicep curl benefits is the fact that it is effective in targeting the brachialis muscle, which is the muscle that bridges the bone within the upper arm with those within the forearm. Reversing the usual grip allows this to happen, and develops muscular strength in the area as well as hypertrophy if you perform the exercise with progressive overload. 

#3 - Cable Rope Hammer Curl

Set Up: The cable hammer curl requires a cable machine set to an appropriate weight, as well as a cable rope attachment. This allows the user to apply a neutral grip that is required for any version of the hammer curl

Starting Position:

double bicep cable curl image

  • Face the cable machine, and have your feet positioned at around hip-width apart. 
  • Grip the cable rope attachment with a neutral grip, and hold it just in front of your thighs. 
  • Your arms should be extended with a slight bend in your elbows, and your elbows should be positioned to be close to your sides. 
  • Have your back straight, your shoulders back, and your neck in line with your spine. You may find it useful to perform this exercise in front of a mirror to monitor your form. 

Execution:

straight bar bicep cable curl

  • Inhale and tighten your core before you begin the cable rope hammer curl.
  • Bending at the elbows, curl the rope attachment upwards in a slow and steady motion. 
  • Stop when your elbows are at a 90-degree angle, and inhale. Wait two seconds before you resume the exercise. 
  • Carefully lower the attachment until your arms are extended, but keep a slight bend in your elbows. You should also ensure that the weights stay suspended, and that they don’t drop into the stack. 
  • Repeat.

Cable Hammer Curl Muscles Worked:

Primary Movers: Biceps, deltoids 

Secondary Muscles: Triceps, brachialis, brachioradialis, trapezius 

Cable Hammer Curl Mistakes to Avoid:

  • Curling too fast. When compared to other arm exercises that require dumbbells or barbells, this exercise uses a relatively small range of motion. This makes it tempting to use swift movements whilst completing it. However, doing so will negate the benefits that you hope to receive from performing the exercise as it means that you are working against much less resistance. To avoid this, use a controlled tempo and ensure that the weights that you are using are not too challenging for you.
  • Lifting too heavy. This links to our previous point, and is one of the most common cable rope hammer curl mistakes. This is due to the fact that the cable machine can be deceiving when it comes to the amount of resistance that you feel when beginning the exercise; you are lifting the weights with the assistance of the cable. This can mean that the weights become more challenging to lift as your sets continue, and that you struggle to maintain good form. You should switch to a lighter weight if this happens. 
  • Using the wrong stance. Many people make the mistake of standing with their feet together when using the cable machine, but this is incorrect. They should be placed at around hip-width apart to avoid injury, or at shoulder-width apart if this is more comfortable. 

Cable Hammer Curl Benefits: 

  • Since the cable rope hammer curl is performed with a neutral grip, it targets the long head of the bicep which is sometimes neglected when other grips are applied. This leads to increased bicep strength and size when performed alongside other cable bicep curl variations, as it keeps the user’s training programme varied and means that the biceps are worked from a variety of angles. 
  • Another of the main cable rope hammer curl benefits is the fact that the neutral grip allows the user to build greater wrist stability with regular practise. The muscles surrounding the wrist are strengthened when a neutral grip is applied, and this can develop grip strength in turn, which can then aid the user in more complex weightlifting exercises. If you are interested in improving this, take a look at the 17 best forearm exercises for mass & grip strength by OriGym

#4 - High Cable Curl

Set Up: The high cable curl requires access to two high pulley machines, and two handle attachments. Both machines should be set to the same weight, and the user should start with a lighter weight if they have not previously attempted this exercise. 

Starting Position: 

what is a cable bicep curl

  • Stand tall with your back straight, chest up, shoulders back, and your head in line with your spine. 
  • Your feet should be positioned just over shoulder-width apart on the floor. 
  • Grip the handle attachments in an underhand grip (your palms facing upwards), and keep a slight bend in your elbows. 

Execution:

standing bicep cable curl behind

  • Before beginning the exercise, inhale and ensure that your core is braced. 
  • Exhale, and curl the handle attachments upwards towards your head. Ensure that your elbows remain in a fixed position throughout, and stop when they reach a 90-degree angle. 
  • Hold your position for two seconds minimum before resuming the exercise, and inhale. 
  • Carefully reverse the movement until the handle attachments are back in the starting position, exhaling as you do so. 
  • Be careful not to drop the weights back into the stack at the bottom of the movement, and keep a slight bend in your elbows ready for your next repetition. 
  • Repeat!

Muscles Worked:

Primary Movers: Biceps brachii (inner head). 

Secondary Muscles: Brachialis, brachioradialis, anterior deltoid, trapezius, levator scapulae. 

Common Mistakes to Avoid:

  • Allowing the elbows to move. Since this exercise is performed without the elbows tucked in close at the user’s sides, it is increasingly easier to make this mistake. You should consider performing the exercise in front of a mirror to ensure that this does not happen, and that your elbows remain in a fixed position throughout. 
  • Lifting too heavy. Many people struggle to perform this exercise with the weight setting that they are used to when they first attempt it, since the arms are placed in a completely different position. If you find yourself doing this, ensure that you switch to a lighter weight so that you can avoid shifting the resistance onto other areas of the upper body. 
  • Allowing the weights to drop. This is one of the most common high cable curl mistakes, and you definitely want to avoid it if you are hoping to build strength and muscular hypertrophy through this exercise. The weights should always be suspended throughout this exercise so as to maintain a good level of resistance for the biceps and supporting muscles to work against. 

Benefits of this Exercise:

  • Much like the inner bicep curl, this exercise targets the short inner head of the biceps that sits within the biceps brachii. This is the area that improves the overall thickness and width of the biceps when worked regularly, yet is seldom targeted through other cable bicep curl variations. Performing this exercise alongside exercises like the cable rope hammer curl and the cable preacher curl will ensure that you target both heads of the biceps from multiple angles, and therefore achieve optimum results. 
  • The secondary stabilising muscles that are worked during this exercise include the anterior deltoid, the trapezius, and the levator scapulae. These are sometimes overlooked during free weight exercises, and it is therefore a great idea to perform this exercise alongside those to achieve more progress over a shorter period of time. 

#5 - Lying Cable Curl

Set Up: To complete the lying cable curl you will require a cable machine, alongside a cable bar attachment and a flat weight bench. You should ensure that it is set to a weight that you can comfortably lift, but poses enough of a challenge. 

Starting Position: 

bicep curl cable cross

  • Begin by lying with your back flat to the gym bench, and your feet positioned in a wide stance for added stability; just over shoulder-width apart is our preferred position. 
  • Grip the cable bar attachment in an underhand grip (your palms facing upwards), and with your hands positioned to be in line with your shoulders. 
  • Your arms should be extended, but with a slight bend in your elbows. 
  • Ensure that your back is straight, and that your head is in line with your spine throughout the exercise. 

Execution:

cable bicep curl rope

  • Inhale before you begin, and make sure that your core is tight. 
  • By bending at the elbows, curl the cable rope attachment upwards until your elbows reach a 90-degree angle. Exhale as you perform this phase of the exercise and squeeze your biceps towards the top of the movement. 
  • Hold your position for at least two seconds before beginning the second phase, and inhale. 
  • Exhale as you move the attachment back into the starting position, keeping the movement slow and controlled. Ensure that there is a slight bend in your elbows at the bottom of the movement, and that the weights do not drop into the stack. 
  • Repeat for your desired amount of repetitions! 

Muscles Worked:

Primary Movers: Biceps. 

Secondary Muscles: Brachialis, brachioradialis, anterior deltoid, trapezius, levator scapulae. 

Common Mistakes to Avoid:

  • Using a weight that is too heavy. This is dangerous yet easily done if you do not start with a lighter weight. The cable machine can be deceiving when it comes to the user having an awareness of the amount of weight that they are working with, as the cable itself assists them in lifting it. If you lift your shoulders or arch your back during the exercise, it’s clear that the weight that you are using is too heavy for you. 
  • Flaring the elbows. It is incredibly important that you keep your elbows tucked in close at your sides during this exercise, and that they do not move from their fixed position at any point. Not only will moving them mean that you nullify the benefits of the exercise, but it could also lead to a nasty injury. 

Benefits of this Exercise:

  • One of the biggest lying cable curl benefits compared to those of some of the other cable bicep curl variations is the fact that the introduction of the flat gym bench actually removes the ability to cheat through momentum. The ground reaction force that the biceps must work against is increased, and the exercise is therefore more challenging. Therefore, when this exercise is performed regularly the user will benefit from increased muscle strength and growth. 
  • Another of the main benefits is that the path of motion that the attachment must travel across is significantly more controlled than those that are present in free weight exercises, meaning that this is technically a safer exercise to complete. It is ideal for those looking to progress to free weight exercises at a later date.

#6 - Cable Preacher Curl 

Set Up: For the final exercise in our list of cable bicep curl variations, the cable preacher curl, you will require a low cable pulley machine and a preacher bench as well as a cable bar attachment. 

Starting Position: 

reverse bicep cable curl

  • Grip the cable bar attachment with an underhand grip, and pull it towards the preacher bench before you get into position. 
  • Stand with your feet just over shoulder-width apart as you lean onto the bench with both arms, and ensure the back of your upper arms are secure against the support pad.
  • Your arms should be extended with a slight bend in your elbows. 
  • Ensure that your back is straight, and that your head is in line with your spine. 

Execution:

how to do a cable bicep curl

  • Begin by inhaling, and bracing your core. 
  • Bending at the elbows, curl the cable bar attachment upwards until your elbows reach a 90-degree angle in relation to your upper arms. Exhale as you complete this movement. 
  • Hold this position for a minimum of two seconds, and inhale. 
  • Whilst exhaling, bring the attachment back down into the starting position in a controlled motion. Keep a slight bend in your elbows as your arms extend. 
  • Ensure that the weights do not drop back into the stack; keep them suspended ready for your next repetition. 
  • Repeat! 

Muscles Worked:

Primary Movers: Biceps brachii. 

Secondary Muscles: Brachialis, brachioradialis. 

Common Mistakes to Avoid:

  • Arching the lower back. This is easily done when performing this exercise, especially for those who have not previously used a preacher bench. You should ideally perform the cable preacher curl in front of a mirror so that you can monitor your form, and ensure that your back is straight at all times. 
  • Incorrect arm placement. Another of the most common cable preacher curl mistakes is incorrect arm placement on the preacher bench support pad. The backs of your upper arms should be secured against the pad, and your elbows should be in line with your shoulders both before you begin the exercise and during it. 
  • Using weights that are too heavy. This is probably the most common mistake when it comes to this exercise, but thankfully the easiest to rectify. Sure signs that point to the fact that you are lifting too heavy include poor form, strain in your elbow or shoulder joints, and struggling to complete a full set. If you notice any of these things, you should switch to a lighter weight immediately. 

Benefits of this Exercise:

  • Since this exercise uses a preacher bench, it removes the ability to cheat through momentum and ultimately makes this one of the most challenging cable bicep curl exercises. The biceps brachii is forced to work against the resistance that the cable machine is providing as well as an increased ground reaction force, and so this exercise is effective for promoting muscle growth and improved strength in the biceps. 
  • Another of the main cable preacher curl benefits is the fact that the exercise forces the user into using negative movement, which essentially means that the majority of the resistance is felt during the eccentric phase of this exercise, rather than the concentric. The exercise is therefore incredibly effective in promoting rapid strength and hypertrophy gains, and even more so when the user is able to progress to dumbbell preacher curls. 

Conclusion

Now that you’re armed with our tips for making the most out of the bicep cable curl as well as its variations, there is nothing stopping you from adding this exercise to your arms workout routine and achieving some impressive results.

Before you go, if you have a passion for learning more about fitness and using this knowledge to help others in their journey, be sure to check out OriGym’s Diploma in Personal Training, as well as our FREE course prospectus.  

References

  1. Schoenfeld, Brad J The Mechanisms of Muscle Hypertrophy and Their Application to Resistance Training, Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: October 2010 - Volume 24 - Issue 10 - p 2857-2872 doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181e840f3

Written by Chloe Twist

Fitness Content Manager, OriGym

Join Chloe on Facebook at the OriGym Facebook Group

Chloe graduated with a BA (Hons) English and Creative Writing from Liverpool John Moores University and prior to OriGym worked at J&R Digital Marketing Agency on the Liverpool 'Female Founders' series. Since joining the company, she has become a qualified Personal Trainer and advanced Sports Nutrition Specialist. Chloe’s professional interests intersect content-development and the world of online fitness, especially across social media and YouTube, and Chloe has herself contributed pieces on fitness and weight loss to sites including the Daily Star and The Express. Outside her day-to-day role, Chloe enjoys playing the guitar, gaming and kettlebell training. 

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